• BDSM is an acronym encompassing a variety of sexual practices that include: bondage/discipline, dominance/submission, and sadism/masochism. The practice of BDSM usually consists of partners taking on specific roles in which one partner is dominant and the other is submissive.
  • BDSM practitioners (individuals who frequently engage in BDSM play) can experience various mental health benefits from engaging in their scenes.
  • According to the research, subspace is often characterized by the activation of the sympathetic nervous system, the release of epinephrine and endorphins, and a subsequent period of non-verbal, deep relaxation.

The psychology of BDSM

Many experts have weighed in on the significant mental and physical health benefits of sex:

  • Lower blood pressure
  • Stronger immune system
  • Better heart health
  • Improved self-esteem
  • Decreased symptoms of depression and anxiety
  • Better sleep routines

However, there is an increasing interest in studies that explore the specific mental and physical health benefits of BDSM practices. BDSM practitioners (individuals who frequently engage in BDSM play) can experience various mental health benefits from engaging in their scenes. For example, one study suggests that being dominant in the bedroom can boost your work ethic. Other research in this area has suggested engaging in BDSM activities can boost your mental well-being and increase awareness of your attachment style in partnerships, which can ultimately lead to healthier relationships. Additionally, unhealthy stereotypes and misconceptions about BDSM have also been addressed by experts.

A natural starting point for more research surrounding the mental health impact of BDSM practices is to explore what happens in a person’s mind and body when they experience intense sexual activity. While physical reactions (such as arousal and climax) are quite typical, there is something unique that happens to individuals who participate in intense BDSM scenes.

February 16th, 2021

Read The Full Article Here: BIG THINK; BDSM therapy: Are there therapeutic and relational benefits to being submissive? by Jaimee Bell