Over the weekend, as sex workers marched for their rights on International Whores’ Day, the BDSM porn site Kink.com released a set of documents intended to address consent during porn shoots. These forms, filled with lists of sex acts alongside checkboxes, might seem like simple paperwork, but they address a bigger upheaval in the adult industry. In recent years, a series of performers have come forward with on-set abuse allegations involving claims of misleading booking practices, excessive roughness, and boundary violations.Now Kink, which was named in some previous allegations, is sharing detailed consent checklists that it hopes will become industry standard.

“The documents we’ve published are not dictums, nor legal documents, but starting points for you to customize, adjust, and use to safely create adult content,” reads the new landing page, which is being shared with performers and producers.

As Kink spokesperson Mike Stabile tells it, these documents were necessitated by the reality of a rapidly changing adult industry that used to revolve around big studios and contract stars. Now, thanks to the democratizing powers of the internet and the rise of piracy-fueled tube sites, it’s a decentralized business with hundreds of independent producers without access to institutional knowledge. There has also been a rise in small-time productions making “rougher” content, without any experience with BDSM consent protocols, argues Stabile. Kink, on the other hand, has 20 years of experience shooting and distributing BDSM content.

Kink also has experience with abuse allegations. In 2015, Kink was named in three allegations against performer James Deen—in one case during a porn shoot, as well as in two alleged incidents at the company’s then-headquarters in San Francisco. (Deen denied the allegations.) “It’s not that we’re perfect,” said Stabile. “These are intensive sets. As you know, we have worked through issues before and, hopefully, evolved.”

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After abuse allegations in Porn, Kink.com introduces consent documents by Tracy Clark-Flory

June 4th, 2019