To peg or not to peg? In a famous scene from Broad City, Abbi grapples with this question when her date, Jeremy, hands her a strap-on dildo and eagerly assumes the position. After running to the bathroom to call her friend Ilana for advice, Abbi agrees to do it. In the end, everyone is happy—that is, until Abbi accidentally ruins Jeremy’s dildo by running it through the dishwasher and replaces it with a cheap substitute.

Scenes like this in which a woman anally penetrates her male partner (a sex act known colloquially as “pegging”) have become increasingly popular in both pornography and popular culture since the turn of the century. For example, there are now well over 1,000 pegging videos on Pornhub alone, and several major television series and films have dealt with the subject, from Weeds to Deadpool.

So why is that? What’s behind the growing pop culture pegging trend?

In part, it’s due to the fact that pegging just so happens to be something that many men and women find to be a turn-on. So, on some level, what we’re seeing here is simply a reflection of our sexual fantasies. However, sexuality experts think the media’s fascination with pegging reveals something much deeper. Indeed, these depictions signify a seismic shift in societal views on sex and gender—a shift that has the potential to help all of us improve our sex lives.

Pegging is a more common sexual desire than many people probably think. As telling evidence of this, I studied the sexual fantasies of more than 4,000 Americans for my book Tell Me What You Want and found that nearly 60 percent of the men I surveyed had fantasized about receiving anal sex, while about 40 percent of the women had fantasized about giving it. When you consider that the vast majority of people who took this survey identified as heterosexual, this tells us that anal eroticism—often stereotyped as a desire of gay men—is really quite popular among straight men and women alike.

Read the full article:

The Peak of Pegging? Why Anal Eroticism is Everywhere in Porn and Pop Culture by Justin Lehmiller, Illustration by Molly Cranna

June 22, 2018