BDSM, an acronym for “bondage, discipline/dominance, submission, and sadomasochism” is often misunderstood by the general public. One of the most common misconceptions is that BDSM is dangerous, reckless, and abusive. However, when practiced properly, BDSM is very different than intimate partner abuse.

For decades, BDSM practitioners have maintained that kink is safe, satisfying, and can positively affect both a participant’s sexual desires and their well-being. Over the last few years, science has confirmed these claims. Recent studies have uncovered the many health benefits of BDSM. Researchers have found that those who engage in BDSM activities have better mental health, more satisfaction in their relationships, and less stress than their vanilla-sex counterparts.

Those unfamiliar with BDSM were surprised by a​ ​​study from Northern Illinois University, which revealed that those involved in BDSM are moreconsent-minded when it comes to sex acts and less likely to conform to behaviors associated with rape culture. Practitioners of BDSM displayed “significantly lower levels of benevolent sexism, rape myth acceptance, and victim-blaming.” In other words, they respect the boundaries of their partner and are less likely to cross the boundaries of personal safety.

Even though studies show that BDSM clearly has positive benefits, many who look at these extreme behaviors from the outside perceive this type of sexual behavior as abusive, chaotic, and out of control. Abusive behavior should never be part of the BDSM dynamic, but how can we tell the difference?

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Kinky Sex: The Difference Between BDSM and Abuse by Sunny Megatron

August 16, 2018

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